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Extra! Extra! Ideal Comics News for you!

20090728_LL_14thSt_Newsboy-039Hello, Internet!  We here at the Scottsbluff offices of Ideal Comics are fresh from the floor of the Cheyenne Comic Con. It was a real great time as we spent three days talking about comics and handing our free Ideal Comics coloring books. Free, you ask? Yep, super free. Because that is how we roll.

We decided on an experiment: mini-coloring book of eight pages featuring brand-new adventures of our Golden Age stalwarts Al Djinn and Night Terror–complete ‘Golden Age’ style stories in eight pictures.

We had a lot of great feedback on both the coloring books and the company as a whole, and it really made us take a step back and reassess our position. Since we released our first anthology Zing Comics #1 in 2007, a lot of water has passed under the bridge. Life has moved on, and we have just been bobbing along. Well, this summer going to be the Summer of Ideal Comics. We have plans to redouble our efforts to finish the long awaited Zing Comics #2 as well as finish the Special Edition of Zing Comics #1 (and digital editions of both). As things move on with these projects, we have a few more projects to announce in coming months, so stay tuned.

But with every step forward you run the risk of loss. We have decided to change our update schedule for our web-comic Forces of Good and Evil from twice weekly to every Friday. We are super pleased with the relaunch, and love what Rolf Gerdau has been faithfully bringing to the table; but we also don’t want to lose quality as we press toward this mark!

We are greatly excited, and hope you will take this journey with us!

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“What Home Means to Me: Home is Gratitude” by Gerdau

What Home Means to Me_Gerdau

Our own Rolf Gerdau recently took first place in a local art contest with this info comic. A neat and insightful piece, Rolf uses an almost whimsy parallelism to discuss the very serious ideas of home, contentment, and satisfaction in frank but inclusive terms. Everyone, rich or poor, is challenged to take a hard look at themselves, their assumptions, and their perceptions of those around them. We are proud to showcase it here, and you can read more about the piece and the contest here. And be sure to follow Rolf’s work over at the Forces of Good and Evil!

(Comic/Artwork is the property of Cirrus House, Inc. Used with permission)

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When I think of Ideal Comics by DELW

When I think of Ideal Comics, I think of two words: Genuine and Inspiring. Ideal’s founders, Chris and Rhys, are true fans of fiction and it shows. I have always seen the pair as an invaluable and willing resource for all things comic/sci-fi/nerd related. Their passion for world/character building goes far beyond merely knowing the minutiae Image1aof any given comic book. It permeates their dedication to creating their own living breathing fictional universe, “Escher’s World.” For every character of theirs you see or read you can bet there is a mile’s worth of backstory. No matter how big or small, whether it is a throwaway gag or an entire series, every character has a history, every event has a purpose, and every effect has a cause. Chris and Rhys have grown up immersing themselves in the world of fiction and their dedication to creating one of their own definitely shines through every project.

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When I first encountered Ideal Comics, it was through the adventures of Chad Little and Greg Mason in Forces of Good and Evil. The webcomic completely blew my mind! Since I was a kid, I have always wanted to create stories—books, movies, cartoons, comics, whatever. But there always seemed to a mystery in the process. How does an idea go from point A to point B and turn into a completed project? How does your imagination become reality? For me, Ideal Comics revealed that magic. They showed me that all you had to do to see your dreams come true was have a little bit of gumption. When I first saw the simple black and white format of Forces, I remember immediately having the epiphany “Wow! You can create stories without spending millions of dollars or compromising your ideas!” That has been a very important and invaluable lesson that I have always cherished and will always owe to Chris and Rhys.

Darby Ellis Lewis Wilson is a thinker and writer, and co-creator of the Super University for College Kids

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Get Ready For a Heaping Helping of CHAD

Image1Hello, and a happy Friday to you all in Internet land! Today is a day I have anxiously a-waiting for the last 18 months! Yes, today, in the pages of Forces of Good and Evil we begin the Chad Little epic “Plain History.” Join Chad as he roams across the Great and High Plains and westward to uncover the Mysteries his mother only alluded to in “Parent’s Day.”

Chad has really been through a lot since page 1, from self professed villain to something else. It has been a real pleasure for me, and the whole works has taken on twists I never saw coming, and few we had planned all along. More than a month ago, we promised a Chad-ssential reading list, to get you all up to speed before diving into this latest saga!

  • The beginning is always a great place to start, and “Aptitude” is our beginning; but it doesn’t really get to the heart of who Chad is.
  • I’d say that really starts with “Five Stages,” where Chad has to face his predicament straight on.
  • In “Gym Class: Hijinks and Hi-Jacks” we see Chad and his hero school comrades in a class, and see them starting to gel.
  • In the short “24/7 Mart—Trading Punches” Chad and Greg share some quality time, and Chad meets Jagged Princess for the first time. And what a time it is!
  • Blunt Instruments, or The Curious Tale of Chaddington Little” continues the theme, and shows how, not only is Chad accepted by his new friends, but starts to value them. Just a little.
  • Our next stop in “Day in the Life pt 2: Chad Gets a Girl.” In Part 1, the villain students find themselves spending a week displaced and at hero school. In this chapter, Chad and Jagged Princess end up seeing each other in a new light.
  • Jagged Princess is the main focus of “Happy Birthday, All Your Friends Are Here,” but she gets a vital assist from the ever-more heroic Chad.
  • Chad’s new resolve is challenged in “The Hero’s Path.”
  • And we round out out little tour with “Parent’s Day.” It is the eponymous event at the Jack Cole Institute of Super Heroics, and Chad is accompanied by his Parents. But while Chad is snatched away by Jagged Princess, his mother and an old friend stop a rampaging robot; PlainHistorypt1cover3which leaves Chad with a whole series of questions!

And that Brings us up to now, and “Plain History.” The story starts next week with Part 1, and it is a doozy. Before I go, though, I wanted to share this alternate cover art done by Rolf Gerdau. Look forward to more art from this notable local talent, and Happy Reading!

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Celebrate!

2016-01-03 The Other Lenny CoverWelcome Back, Internet. It has been too long, but the real world has sadly interfered with my best of intentions. So it was last week that I meant to get this written and posted and celebrated. After all, last week was sort of a big deal here on the IC homestead. It was ten years ago—3rd January 2006—that we published the first page of Forces of Good and Evil. To me, that made last Sunday a big deal—for a decade we have been telling stories about these crazy high-schoolers.

When we started, it was just Chris and me, and it was just a vehicle to introduce people to our universe—a place were super heroes ended WW2, where alien technology had given us unlimited energy, and where the US Department of Education trained super -heroes and -villains! That first story was crude and rough and kinda ugly, but it will always have a special place in my heart. In the left ventricle.

Sunday last was a big deal for me for another reason, too. It was the launch of a new story, restarting Forces after a year long hiatus (for those of you who wonder what ever happened to Buckskin Boone— don’t fret. That tale will be finished soon!) Leading the charge on this new six pager, is our new fill-in artist, Taliesin Reese. A young fella with a lot of talent, it has been a real joy working with him; and page three of his debut story posted today.

Chris already wrote a little about this on drop day, but this is mine! “Meanwhile…The Other Lenny” focuses on two of our background characters. Lenny was assigned as Greg’s henchman way back in “The Most Evil Villain of all Time, Ever” (specifically here).
The Anthrax sprung out of a cheap joke, but a nod to The Muppet Movie, that we stuck into “Disco Fever.” He and Lenny both returned in “Day in the Life, Pt 1,” but The Anthrax really has a moment to shine in “Demon’s Diary,” if I do say so. But this, this story is Lenny’s moment.

Anyway, that was my trip through the past and looking into the future. I hope you all enjoyed it, and Happy Reading!

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It’s a Winter Wonderland!

IClogo_2A test1dWelcome Internet, and Happy Hanukkah. This is the part of the blog where I normally welcome people to Quarterbin Follies. Not so today. In fact, I will be putting Quarterbin Follies on hold here on idealcomics.net throughout rest of the year. But wait, you might say, where will I go to read about all kinds of old comics. Well, you may want to check out Gaming Rebellion (just saying); but here on Ideal we will be talking about new comics. OUR new comics.

2016-01-04 DO I EVEN KNOW YOUThat’s right kids, Ideal Comics is going back in the business of making new, weekly web-comics. Now, I know it’s been almost a year since any Forces goodness has eeked out. And I’m not going to lie, that bums me out, too; but take heart gentle readers, for we have got some dynamite stuff coming up. Throughout the month of December, we here at the Ideal Comics editorial will be highlighting some of our favorite Forces stories. Plus, we will also be giving you a Chad-centric reading list to get you up to speed for next Forces epic. See, we have been working in the shadows for months; and the fun all starts on our 10 year anniversary, January third! Then we will be launching a new Forces story featuring the art of Taliesin Reese. This is going to be a quick six page story, a little side rail into our Forces Of Good And Evil universe; and it is set during the “National Villainy“, our last long-form epic!

Image1Coming up after that is the first chapter in our Chad Little Extravaganza “Plain History”. Spinning out of the events of “Parent’s Day”, we will have the chance to follow Chad as he tracks down his mother’s big secret in this (graphic) novel length story! Chapter one will feature the art of another Ideal Comics new-comer of Rolf Gerdau based on the script by yours truly. Look for fun and exciting things coming up here, let me tell you!

All in all, good things are coming your way; and for all you Ideal Comics faithful, we thank you for your continued readership and patronage. We look forward to the coming year, and to providing you with “Everything Great About Comics!”

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Quarterbin Follies #31: Spider-Man says “Happy St Andrew’s Day!”

Image1Hello and welcome to a special St Andrew’s Day edition of Quarterbin Follies! What is St. Andrew’s Day, you ask? Well, it is the feast day in honor of St Andrew, patron saint of the nation of Scotland, and so, I thought I would take this opportunity to look into Charles Vess‘s Spider-Man: Spirits of the Earth. But what does this have to do with St Andrew? Not much, but read on!

Charles Vess, you might recognize, is an artist and painter, and frequent collaborator with Neil Gaiman. In fact, it was Vess‘s gorgeous paintings that adorn the graphic version of Stardust (sadly, I only have the picture-less mass-market paperback that was released the year before the film hit theaters, but I digress).

As recounted by Vess himself in the Afterword, Vess suffered a very similar affliction as many of us Yankees—a fascination with the mysterious Highlands of Scotland. Yes, there are many of us under Old Glory’s stripes and starry field that harbor a romance and longing for those foggy and forbidding slopes, and it was in 1983 that Vess took his first trip across the pond. Years went on and Vess found a way to combine his love of the land and people of Scotland with his job as a comics and fantasy illustrator.

In 1990, Vess released Spirits, having written, painted, and even lettered it, and it was a labor of love. The book was published by Marvel as a full glossy, hardcover book, complete with a fancy dust jacket and a $18.95 price tag. Now you might be asking why I am reviewing a $20 comic in a column called “Quarterbin Follies.” Well, I just have to say, “Thanks, Goodwill!” The other more pressing question is what is Spider-Man doing in Scotland?

Image4This is in fact the question posited by the fancy dust jacket. After all, there may not be a comic character more in tune with and tied into New York City than Spider-Man. The book even begins with a beautiful full page in inks and watercolors showcasing ol’ Spidey enraptured with his home-turf. But before long we see our hero and his bride flying across the sea. Mary Jane (and, yes, I am going to ignore “One More Day,” thanks for asking) is the sole inheritor of a bit of farmland in the Highland town of Lochalsh. Mrs. Mary MacLeod left the cottage and bit of acreage to MJ in hopes that is would not be sold off, a fate she had lamented in the letter that accompanied the will.

Before long, Pete and MJ arrive in the scenic and peaceful village; and it isn’t more than two pages before Peter begins complaining that the Highlands are just not New York. I mean, peace and quiet are nice, but what about the noise and danger?! The couple spend a couple of days puttering about the village and in the MacLeod cottage before an evening at the Pub turns very interesting. In over-hearing the town gossip, Peter is surprised to hear tales of fairies and specters across the moors that have more and more folks talking about selling out to a faceless real estate company intent on buying all the land round about the loch and the recently abandoned castle of Duncraig.

You see, this whole village and territory has been presided over for six generations by the scions and Lairds Munro, but of late, disease and misfortune have claimed all but three of the once great house: the Laird Hugh, his nephew Angus Munro and the Hugh’s heir and grandson young Hugh. Several of the townsfolk and the Laird himself attest to seeing the young one snatched away by fairies, just like in some old legend. Not long after, ghosts and faeries sent old Hugh packing to a flat in town, and now he is a sad, broken shell of his former self.

All this sends Peter’s skeptic and curious mind a-whirling, and after his own personal encounter with the spectral nasties, Spider-Man is enlisted by a local weird hag (and I mean that in a literary sense) called Dark Mairi of the Shore to save the land from this threat, which she is adamant has nothing to do with ghost or the Fair Folk below the hills.

Image5In the end, city-boy Parker finds himself at the crossroads of pseudo-science and magic far-far away from his beloved bright lights; and in a modern legend as at home next door to Scottish tales of the Kelpie or of Tam Lin as it is in the middle of Marvel‘s 616 Universe. I previously made mention of Peter’s obvious discomfort in the setting of Highland Scotland, away from his city and from his scientific reasoning. Nevertheless, on the pages of Spirits this complaining does not set the tone for the piece. Rather, the graphic novel as a whole serves as Vess‘s love letter to the Highlands—Peter’s discontent juxtaposing the surrounding and enthralling mystery of timeless places. It was also a treat to see MJ given a role in the victory in a way that honors her own fighter’s spirit and the supportive love she holds for her husband.

These feats Vess completes with a nuanced grace, with the ease of a studied storyteller, and with stunning visuals to make the heart weep. My one complaint with the story is that the denouement is certainly too brief, and too tidily wraps up the handful of loose ends left behind in the climax. Nevertheless, this was a joy to read and to review; and well worth checking out at (almost) any opportunity.

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Quarterbin Follies #30: Madame Xanadu for You!

Image1Hello, Internet, and welcome back. This week, I am going to jump from a title that sounds spooky and was not (two weeks on The Spirit); and on to a book that is actually pretty spooky. If I’d had it all together, I’d have this for Hallowe’en. C’est la vie.

Well, this week’s book begins at the end. That is to say, Madame Xanadu #1 is the first of nothing, but rather, it is the last installment of the ’70’s DC Comics ‘mystery’ strip Doorway to Nightmare. The strip was originally home in a book of the same name, but the title was canned in the infamous DC Implosion, and Xanadu was sent to a new home in The Unexpected. “Doorway to Nightmare” lasted until 1980, and in 1981 DC published Madame Xanadu #1 as their second ever direct market/comic shop exclusive. But that was the end of the “Door Into Nightmare.” Xanadu herself would return in a great many places, but I digress.

Madame Xanadu tales of the time fit a given pattern, and “A Dance for Two Demons” is no exception, here written by Steve Englehart and pencilled by Marshall Rogers. In the Madame’s dark and creepy parlor, on a dark and creepy night, a lost soul has found his way there, looking for some kind of redemption or rescue. It is a down and out druggie named Joe. Hearing a rumor that Xanadu is a witchy-woman, Joe has come looking for a magic potion to help him kick the habit. Madame X tells him there is nothing she can do, that the magic he needs is the power of harnessing his free will through discipline. She sends the lost fellow down the way to a rehab center, instructing him to tell the folks Xanadu sent him.

Image2A few hours later, Madame Xanadu is again visited, this time by a red-headed hayseed– a young gal named Laura with a story to tell. I turns out that back home in the mid-West while visiting her aged aunt, the older woman confided that in her youth she had dabbled in witchcraft–even gotten a hold of an ancient spell-book! Laura had been horrified, but also intrigued, and she admits to sneaking away the leather bound tome to check out in secret. Not long after, Auntie’s house caught fire, and the old gal died. This freaked out Laura, who booked to NYC to meet up with her late aunt’s old friend, the seeming ageless Madame Xanadu. Laura claims she doesn’t really believe in magic, but permits Madame X to do a tarot reading.

Madame Xanadu determines that Laura is on a dangerous path, and will meddle with dark powers she is no match for. This Laura mocks, because, remember, she doesn’t really believe in magic; but when Xanadu asks for the spell-book, Laura spooks and gets up to leave.

On her way out, Laura runs into a returning Joseph. He has bailed from rehab after a few hours because it was just too hard. He is certain magic is the answer, and is more than dissatisfied with Madame Xanadu’s rebuffing. It is just then that Joe and Laura take notice of each other. A deep and enduring notice of each other.

What emerges in the story really are two views of magic. Xanadu represents a passive view, using magic to gain knowledge and for defense only. Laura, who becomes enthralled by the spell-book and the power it offers, uses magic in an active way, willing to use even love and sex to control others and gather puissance to herself. Only when it is almost too late does she realize she has been used by forces greater and darker than she had comprehended.

Image3The book closes out with a sci-fi back-up by J.M. DeMatteis and Brian Boland called “Falling Down to Heaven…” It is a sad and somber tale of war, survival, injustice, loss and forgiveness as an alien and his ailing wife find themselves facing the prospect of dealing with an injured human who has fallen from the sky.

All told, this was a fun, if spooky, read. Perfectly in tune with the DC‘s 1970’s mystery fair. It seems odd to me that this was the first and last issue. I imagine that it’s status as the second direct market DC book (including a full-color center-fold poster of Madame Xanadu by character creator Michael Kaluta) probably means it was published as an experiment that didn’t go so well. But I suppose that is he way things go. For my sake, I’m glad I ran across it and could bring it here, to the “Quarterbin.”

 

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Quarterbin Follies #29: Losing The Spirit?

CAM00514It is another week and another “Quarterbin Follies,” the column where I myself write about whatever old comic books I read last week. I would like to start this column with a thanks and shout out to Zach, Levi, and all the folks at gamingrebellion.com, who have invited us at Ideal Comics into the Gaming Rebellion family (or club, or clique, or whatever it is), and offered to dual-post this column! We are excited to share our love of comics with a whole new audience!

Enough of that, let us begin!

It was a few years back, and my buddy Andrew Grant handed me a stack of comics. He picked them up for a song, he had said, and he thought of me. Why? Because it had the first three issues of the then-new Will Eisner’s The Spirit from DC Comics; and he knows I like old, nostalgic things.

For the next few years books sat in the bottom of a box, and then a crate for a few years after that until last week when I pulled the things out to read. I tucked into the first issue on a Wednesday morning, and was less than impressed. Now here I really risk sounding like a horrid curmudgeon, partly because I have a lot to complain about here, and partly because I am in fact a horrid curmudgeon. All that being said, I think I will start with the highlights.

This 2010 effort was drawn by the mononymic Moritat the book is damned pretty. The first page is even a direct, and frankly ‘wowing’ homage to Eisner‘s unique design work. Within the book itself the style owes more than a little to Bruce Timm, with The Spirit‘s Great Lakes based Central City possessing a certain timelessness despite definitely not being set in the Forties or Fifties of the Eisner originals.CAM00513

Like in the original comics, the Mark Schultz-penned script treats The Spirit as an indefatigable defender of the downtrodden and the afflicted, and Commissioner Dolan as the haggard last-clean-cop in Central City. Well, that is about the end of the good, frankly. Once you get past the senseless progressive speech-ified narration, the setting is nothing but the dismal and stereotypical ‘grim-n-gritty’ Gotham City clones that pervaded the comics of a decade-and-more ago. There is nothing interesting or distinct here, and even the previously lauded timelessness seems distracting. Schultz does a fine job making the villains seem villainous, but only slightly more so that the police.

Entirely divorced from the tale is Eisner‘s whimsy. For any who might not have read my last post, much of the beauty and genius of Eisner‘s stories was his ability to balance the graphic with the cartoon–the silly with the serious. The Spirit had the ability to transcend the detective genre, which was his home, and tackle ne’er-do-wells of any stripe, and often with a self-aware smile shared by hero and reader alike. But under Schultz‘s pen, there is no joy and no hope, and no cock-sure bluster; just a grim, grey impulse more suited to Frank Miller or Dashiell Hammett than Eisner— more Chinatown than The Spirit.

I gotta say that I have no problem with dark tales. There is a place for the Red Harvests of the world, but I think Schultz is just missing the point. He was writing The Spirit, and the Spirit has a zeitgeist of his own. But is seems like maybe Schultz was trying to write Ms. Tree instead.

CAM00516And before you go calling me a feeb who just doesn’t get “it,” let me point you to the “The Spirit: Black and White” back-up in that very issue, brought together by the formidable and legendary Denny O’Neil and Bill Sienkiewicz. It is a tale dark and serious, true, but with a delightfully ironic ending so sharp I almost started laughing. Now, THAT was a “Spirit ” story, and well worth the price of admission (provided you can find it in the Quarterbin).

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Quarterbin Follies #28: Getting into the Spirit

Image2So, I suppose all you, faithful pilgrims to the shrine that is “QuarterBin Follies,” have waited with a fervor-like expectation for today’s article. After many, many months I am finally set down to scrawl a note about The Spirit. Mark it on the calendar, kids. It is a big day. (Also, Happy Hallowe’en)

Ahem.

I did not grow up reading Will Eisner comics, or ever really knowing who The Spirit was. As I took my first steps into superhero comics in the 1990’s, it was actually a time when comics printed letters in the back from fans and readers. These columns of tiny print discussed the monthly on-goings of your favorite spandex avengers, and that is where I first heard of The Spirit, but it was not until 1996 that I actually had the chance to see Eisner’s is work.

1996 was a hard here for me. I was a high school senior who had been taken from his western Nebraska home and dropped in the middle of big city Denver, Colorado. In a tale that is not worth the telling here, I found myself skipping school and wandering about Lakewood (a Denver suburb), and there in the library I found a copy of Will Eisner’s Comics and Sequential Art. Now, at this point in my life I had already decided I wanted to make comics–I already designed my first comic book universe (it’s still pretty awesome)–but I had never been exposed to such a practical, thoughtful approach to comics from a structural view. Greatly impressed I was, but I had still never read The Spirit.

Will Eisner was one of the first professional comic artists, getting his start as a boy in New York City. Before creating The Spirit, he had already made a name for himself at Eisner and Iger Studios, where they produced original material for up-and-coming comic books companies such as Quality Comics and Fox Comics; and where Eisner created such characters as Black Hawk and Doll-man.

Image4Enter “Busy” Arnold, publisher of Quality Comics. It seems that in 1939, the newspaper syndicates were looking for a way to cash into the comic book boom. Arnold approached Eisner with the opportunity to be the guy and create the superhero to save the newspapers. Eisner left his profitable gig at Eisner and Iger to join the task, and created the masked detective and resident not-dead -guy The Spirit!

Back to my story. For the next nineteen years, I read about The Spirit. I read single pages from Spirit stories, and I even had the chance to read stories featuring Midnight, Will Eisner‘s less-than-serious copycat character for Quality Comics, but I have never actually read a Spirit story. So it was with some excitement that I got my hands on a copy of The Spirit # 9 from Kitchen Sink . It was back in the 1980’s that Kitchen Sink began to reprint old issues of The Spirit weekly as a monthly book format; and #9 was published in 1985. I received #9 as a gift from my pal Andrew Grant, I think

There are five stories in this issue, ranging from the absurd “Distinguished Men Prefer Borschtbelt’s Buttermilk,” which essentially follows the same plot as the Dan Aykroyd and Eddie Murphy vehicle “Trading Places;” to the graphic and violent “The Vortex,” which a study of mental illness, greed, and power. For me, the stand out story is “Smugglers Cove.”

“Smugglers Cove” is a tribute/pastiche of the boy’s adventure sub-genre of American pop-fiction. In this particular episode, The Spirit’s youthful ward Ebony and adventuring toddler P.S. Smith head off to find adventure on a raft, accompanied only by Ebony’s portable transistor radio. This story is without spoken dialoge, the perfomer on the radio narrates a pirate story calling boys of all ages to adventure. It a very interesting twist to watch the boys take off on their own adventure in Rounding up some modern-day casino-pirates to the narration of the radio program.

Image3I want to take a moment to jump off the rails and discuss the character Ebony. For those of you unfamiliar with The Spirit, Ebony is a young African American boy who is Spirit befriends early in his career. Eleven year-old Ebony is first shown driving a taxi in the Big City and making a living for himself. The Spirit finds him resourceful and clever, and takes him under his wing. That description is all well and good but the portrayal of Ebony has been somewhat disturbing, for while he was portrayed as intelligent and quick witted and kind, Ebony was drawn in black-face, and spoke with speech peppered with misspellings and malapropisms. These stereotypically racist emblems were intentionally used by Eisner to poke fun at the idea racial stereotypes. His intention was to demonstrate that regardless of education or upbringing or public opinion, a person is capable and valuable, and capable in whatever he or she would whole-heartedly set themselves. It is the strength of the Individual, not the limitation of biologic history that truly matter. Ebony is most certainly an example of this, and routinely displays capacity, whit, and courage without compare.

And it is easy to understand why The Spirit and his stories have had the staying power for almost 80 years. It was also very interesting to see what they did to stretch the genre of comics and sequential storytelling, especially for not being printed as part of the traditional comics magazine industry. In some ways, I suppose it might be said The Spirit was an original precursor to modern web comics, in terms that its delivery was intended for everyone. It was comics delivered to the common man.

While I really enjoyed Will Eisner’s ears tongue-in-cheek style (both in art and In storytelling), it is his precise yet truncated or compressed writing style that continues to impress me the most.

If you enjoyed hearing about in The Spirit, stay tuned here to QuarterBin Follies, where I’m going to be reviewing some modern “The Spirit” offerings in the next few Weeks. Stay tuned, and as always, happy reading.

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